Auditronics

by Mx. Remy Ann David
(Washington DC)

Auditronics was a manufacturer of recording consoles made in Memphis, Tennessee.


The original premiere console they introduced, the 501 also dubbed " Son of 36 Grand ".

This console utilized all IC chip op amps with buffered transistor outputs, with Dean Jensen Transformers, with an output drive capability of +24 dbM, into a 600 ohm load.

It was a quadraphonic console with 26 inputs, 16 outputs and a quadraphonic mix bus.

Within the console there was also a comprehensive TT patchbay.

There were two versions of the 501. The original and the later version. Though modules could not be swapped between the two versions of the same console.

Later, Auditronics offered up a smaller more compact and lower-cost version dubbed the " Grandson ". It was available in both 18 and 24 input frames. It was the model 110-4. Later in the 110-8 was offered. This was electronically identical to the 501's, with one less knob on the EQ. This version had 3 knobs and 6 frequency selections. The Harris Corporation that build professional broadcast transmitters, also offered the 110 rebranded as a Harris.

As the recording industry waned, numerous broadcast, on-air console's for radio, were offered up. They were quite popular.

As the company began to falter, they were absorbed by Wheatstone of North Carolina.

Tom Scholz of the group Boston, cut the premier album in 1976 on his Auditronics 501 into his 12 track, 1 inch, Bridgeport Scully 280-8.

Mx. Remy Ann David

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Apr 26, 2021
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Worked there 1980-85
by: Keith Arnett

Hired by Welton Jetton and Jim Woodworth in 1980, filled positions of asst. sales manager, drafting supervisor, and customer service manager. During this time the company averaged about 50 people.

As CSM, I handled all parts requests and service questions, and maintained the early manuals and wrote the manuals for the 200 and 400 consoles, and other equipment. Worked closely with Engineering and QA in the process, glad to see Duncan's posting.

I'm really glad I was able to work there, and working with Welton, Steve Sage, and Jerry Puckett was a huge benefit. I really owe a lot to Welton. I'm proud to be an Auditronics alumni.

Mar 09, 2021
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Son of Grand 36 NEW
by: Halvor

We have 2 Son of Grand 36 in our studio. One is in almost daily use and have been here in Norway since the mid 90`s, i think it was bulit in 1971 or so. The second is being used for spare parts, but the plan is to fix that one as well.

Jan 23, 2021
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QC/Tech Support Manager
by: Duncan

I worked at Auditronics for 17 years. A lot of great people worked there. 1980-1994. I have so many stories that I could share. Working there was my dream job. I tested the last 501 to ship, most of the 700 series. I was hired to test the last two 800 series consoles to ship out of the Memphis complex. They were the last two built. Wheatstone took over and moved everything to their factory in NC. I am still in contact with several people that had worked there. We were like a large family.

Dec 28, 2020
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Worked there
by: Bill Carpenter

I worked there part time in the early ‘70’s while attending Memphis State. Started in mechanical assembly, then in engineering. Great memories; great people! Left in 1975.

Nov 25, 2020
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212
by: Kristen A

After using Auditronics for years on air and working the board of a Auditronics Grandson. I loved the consoles. I purchased a used Auditronics 212 for my community and internet radio station Power 96 One (power96fm.com) as our on air console in 2017. We are a non profit and don’t have much money for equipment. I know the board is old but is sounds as clean as it did the day it was new.

We rebuilt the power supply and added a backup. We replaced most of the IC’s, Cleaned the faders and pots, Rebuilt the outputs and upgraded them to the 210 version., Control room and studio boards were rebuilt, Meters re-calibrated, all the lights function, timer and clock function as they should, and with the console cleaned it looks and works like new,
I love the DJ specific plug in EQ boards paired with the compressor limiter board, the phone board works great with a 5 second delay, the machine control boards work great, and finally the EQ board is great as an added option for a guest.

Auditronics was great gear through the years. Not sure I can say that about new consoles. Analog audio, digital playout system, and digital audio sounds great through our 30 year old console.

Thanks, Auditronics
Kristen A.


Jul 25, 2020
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Auditronics 110A Grandson Owner
by: Bob B

Adding a quick line to share I own an 18 channel 110A-4 console. I've had it here for awhile, but just had an opportunity to track more heavily with it yesterday. It is limited in it's 4 busses and no phantom power, but sounds so wonderful!

It is great hearing those of you that continue to reflect fondly on these consoles. I'll be enjoying mine here for some time!

If anyone has recommendations on modifications to make it more flexible, I'm curious about direct outs and phantom power. Maybe more work than it's worth?

bob in Seattle

Jul 13, 2020
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Un módulo 110 Está sonando en Argentina
by: Anonymous


I'm Diego Rodríguez, CEO of Buenbeat.com Music and sound. A studio in Buenos Aires Argentina. I got a module from your console. it's a pre 110B. It is our favorite preamp, It has a mystery in its sound and its EQ. It records Voice overs day by day for TV commercials, Jingles and many more things go through his circuits. In love with this Preamplifier and delighted to read in this blog about the history of Auditronics, A big hug from Argentina!

Apr 11, 2020
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Family to Auditronics
by: Cord Livaudais

I am the eldest grandson of Welton Jetton and it is great to hear about all of the great things that my grandfather did and created. I have learned about most of the amazing things he did and people he worked with after his passing. I wish I had known more about him in my youth, and maybe I would have followed in his foot steps.

Aug 17, 2019
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I’m Steve Sage’s daughter and Jerry Puckett’s niece
by: Courtney Sage

So nice to see some familiar names here :)

Jul 09, 2019
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Full circle
by: Chip Benson

I worked for Auditronics as a tech in the early 80's & also for the local dealer.
I had the incredible opportunity to see & learn the manufacturing side, as well as the install & maintenance side of things in some of Memphis' legendary recording & broadcast studios.
I can tell you from experience these consoles were built like a brick house, sound superb & that almost no one makes stuff like they used to!
Now more than 35 years later things have come full circle & I have my own pro audio shop & recording studio. On a side note Spectra 1964 is now making the preamp & EQ modules that went into the early Auditronics consoles & helped make that Memphis Sound.

Jun 24, 2019
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501 Module Insertion
by: Doc Goldstein

So, one thing I just remembered was the little captive nuts that held the modules into the frame.. They were in tracks, so that you would have to line them up before putting a module into the frame. They were a PIA at first until you got used to it, but it means that you could have a little slop when the modules were in place.

A cost saving design?

Jun 24, 2019
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Design engineer
by: Mark Leppert

I worked under Jerry Puckett in the mid 70s. I designed and laid out numerous printed circuit boards for the main consoles. I also designed an amp for a mobile truck studio console. If I remember correctly it was for ABC TV in NYC. Great company and people.

Nov 14, 2018
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I used a 501
by: Doc Goldstein

We had a 501 at United Audio in Santa Ana, CA in the 70's.
I LOVED that console. Together with an M79, we got a great sound in there. I do miss it.

Doc Goldstein

Sep 25, 2018
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tech 1969-70
by: JIM tomlinson

I was the first tech they hired I had just left Bluff City Dist. as a tech. I there until I became
sick from the fumes from the developing tank in the circuit board room where we made the circuit boards for the first console I think it was the 220 but I am not sure.

Jim Tomlinson

Mar 06, 2017
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Worked there
by: David Evers

I started as Engineering Project Manager in 1992, and was VP of Engineering from 1993 to 1995. Worked with Steve Sage, Welton Jetton, Duncan Fuller, Shawn Wilcox, Jerry Puckett, Ben (above), Mike Fulton, Jim Brown, Murray Shields, Mark Cianciola, Dale Davis (mgr of co-owned MFE), Minh Do, and others I can't fully remember now.

It was a great learning experience for me, and I believe I helped usher in a new era for the company in digital electronics and sofware. I was heavily involved in the Destiny 2000 automated console for broadcast; and wrote all of the software for that project.

I understand both Steve Sage and Welton Jetton have passed away. I have fond memories of the company.

David Evers

Sep 10, 2015
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Engineer 95-97
by: Ben Bobbitt

Was an engineer at auditronics right after college. Team of 3 who designed a digital console that... Flopped. Ahead of its time and right at the big radio station consolidation era. Great experience though.

Ben Bobbitt

Jan 27, 2015
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Worked there
by: Jay

I was a QC tech there from 84-91. Welton Jetton and Steve Sage created the company.

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